Pirate Treasure ! Spanish Old World 4 Reales COB Set In 14K Gold

$ 1,250.00

Pirate Treasure !

An Antique Spanish Old World 4 Reales COB, "PIECE OF EIGHT" Coin.  Set In 14K Gold with a nautical shackle so the coin can be worn as a pendant.

MINT: "S" Seville, Spain

ASSAYER: "V"

DATE: nv., circa. 1612-1616

REIGN: PHILIP III

WEIGHT: 12.63 grams.

GOLD WEIGHT: 5.37 grams of 14K gold.

PROVENANCE: Unfortunately lost to time.

Note:  The coin exhibits evidence of being recovered from the ocean (most likely from a shipwreck) especially on the shield side where there is still green saltwater corrosion visible.

Additional Notes: These coins were the most desirable currency of the world for over 300 years from the 1500's - 19th century and were legal tender in the United States until the Act of 1857.

TTI-549321

Some History About The Spanish Coins.

Cob coins were minted at many Spanish Main Land and Spanish colonial New World mints.  They were hand manufactured by cutting blanks from crudely cast bars of refined silver or gold and hand hammered between crudely engraved dies.  Each is unique in shape and strike.

During the 16th, 17th, and 18th centuries, Spain became the premier supplier of gold and silver coins for the world. This was accomplished through the discovery of untold riches that were effectively mined in the Americas. Although Spain's mighty armada strove diligently to deliver wealth to the King, both pirates and bad weather became such obstacles that many galleons were lost at sea. Today's technology enables us to explore the ocean floor for its spectacular treasure.

Coinage of this historical period has fascinated experts as well as novices. These pieces were struck from dies and cut to weight according to the Spanish monetary system. They were called "macuquinas" in Spanish but are known to us as "cobs". Minted in five denominations in silver, the largest was the Eight Reales, famous in the colonies and among pirates as a "Piece Of Eight". The other denominations were Four Reales, Two Reales, One Reale and Half Reale.  

SPANISH DOLLAR

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia



Silver dollar of the Catholic Monarchs, after 1497

Reverse
FERNANDVS ET ELISABET DEI GR[ATIA]
"Ferdinand and Elisabeth, by the Grace of God"
Displays the arms of the Catholic Monarchs post 1492, with Granada in base. Letter S on the left is the sign of the mint of Seville and VIII on the right i.e. eight in roman numerals.

 

A silver Spanish dollar minted in Mexico City c. 1650

Obverse
REX ET REGINA CASTELE LEGIONIS A[RAGONIS]
"King and Queen of Castile, Leon, Aragon..."
Displays the personal emblems of the monarchs: Ferdinand's arrows and Isabella's yoke.

Silver dollar of Philip V of Spain, 1739
Reverse
VTRAQVE VNUM M[EXICO] 1739
"Both (are) one, Mexico [City Mint], 1739"
Displays two hemispheres of a world map, crowned between the Pillars of Hercules adorned with the PLVS VLTR[A] motto.
Obverse
PHILIP[PUS] V D[EI] G[RATIA] HISPAN[IARUM] ET IND[IARUM] REX
"Philip V, by the Grace of God, King of the Spains and the Indies"
Displays the arms of Castile and León with Granada in base and an inescutcheon of Anjou.
Silver dollar of Ferdinand VI of Spain, 1753
Reverse
VTRAQVE VNUM M[EXICO] 1753 M
"Both (are) one, Mexico [City Mint], 1753." Displays two hemispheres of a world map, crowned between the Pillars of Hercules adorned with the PLVS VLT[R]A motto.
Obverse
FERD[INA]ND[US] VI D[EI] G[RATIA] HISPAN[IARUM] ET IND[IARUM] REX
"Ferdinand VI, by the Grace of God, King of the Spains and the Indies"
Displays the arms of Castile and León with Granada in base and an inescutcheon of Anjou.
Silver dollar of Charles III of Spain, 1776
Obverse
CAROLUS III DEI GRATIA 1776
"Charles III by the Grace of God, 1776"
Right profile of Charles III in toga with laurel wreath
Reverse
HISPAN[IARUM] ET IND[IARUM] REX M[EXICO] 8 R[EALES] F M "King of the Spains and the Indies, Mexico [City Mint], 8 reales"
Crowned Spanish arms between the Pillars of Hercules adorned with PLVS VLTRA motto
Silver dollar of King Charles IV of Spain, 1806
Obverse
CAROLUS IIII DEI GRATIA 1806 "Charles IV by the Grace of God, 1806." Right profile of Charles IV in soldier's dress with laurel wreath. It was under the reign of this monarch that the United States Mint began the U.S. silver dollar in 1794.
Reverse
HISPAN[IARUM] ET IND[IARUM] REX M[EXICO] 8 R[EALES] T H"King of the Spains and the Indies, Mexico [City Mint], 8 Reales." Crowned Spanish coat of arms between the Pillars of Hercules adorned with PLVS VLTRA motto
Silver dollar of Ferdinand VII of Spain, 1821
Obverse
FERDIN[ANDUS] VII DEI GRATIA 1821"Ferdinand VII by the Grace of God, 1821." Right profile of Ferdinand VII with cloak and laurel wreath
Reverse
HISPAN[IARUM] ET IND[IARUM] REX M[EXICO] 8 R[EALES] I I"King of the Spains and the Indies, Mexico [City Mint], 8 reales." Crowned Spanish coat of arms between the Pillars of Hercules adorned with PLVS VLTRA motto

The Spanish dollar, also known as the piece of eight (in Spanish: Real de a ocho, Dólar, Peso duro, Peso fuerte or Peso), is a silver coin of approximately 38 mm (1.5 in) diameter worth eight Spanish reales. It was minted in the Spanish Empire following a monetary reform in 1497. It was widely used as the first international currency because of its uniformity in standard and milling characteristics. Some countries countersigned the Spanish dollar so it could be used as their local currency.[1]

The Spanish dollar was the coin upon which the original United States dollar was based, and it remained legal tender in the United States until the Coinage Act of 1857. Because it was widely used in Europe, the Americas, and the Far East, it became the first world currency by the late 18th century.[2][3][4] Aside from the U.S. dollar, several other currencies, such as the Canadian dollar, the Japanese yen, the Chinese yuan, the Philippine peso, and several currencies in the rest of the Americas, were initially based on the Spanish dollar and other 8-real coins.[5] Diverse theories link the origin of the "$" symbol to the columns and stripes that appear on one side of the Spanish dollar.[6]

The term peso was used in Spanish to refer to this denomination, and it became the basis for many of the currencies in the former Spanish colonies, including the Argentine, Bolivian, Chilean, Colombian, Costa Rican, Cuban, Dominican, Ecuadorian, Guatemalan, Honduran, Mexican, Nicaraguan, Paraguayan, Philippine, Puerto Rican, Peruvian, Salvadoran, Uruguayan, and Venezuelan pesos. Of these, "peso" remains the name of the official currency in Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Mexico, Philippines, and Uruguay.

Millions of Spanish dollars were minted over the course of several centuries. They were among the most widely circulating coins of the colonial period in the Americas, and were still in use in North America and in South-East.